Questions answered

Delicate Sparky

I tweeted out the cover to Kop Op, Charlie Brown the other day, as part of a series of ridiculous Peanuts items. And after a comment from a respected member of the comics profession noting that it must be a trace, I tweeted out what was clearly being traced, the cover …

Questions answered

Ferret versus Jeep

In a recent editorial, the management of this station that Charles Schulz had used his advertising work to kill off a beloved cast member of a competing strip. In the interest of community service and with the goal of meeting our obligations under the Federal Equal Time Provisions, we hereby …

Questions answered

Lucy… stole… a jeep?

When I gave my talk at Beaglefest last month, I spoke mainly of the upcoming Complete Peanuts volume 26, showing off the things that would be included in that volume, as well as some of the things that wouldn’t be. And I did display off one of my favorite spot illustrations that …

Questions answered

Linus’s shorthand.

Today, newspapers reran the December 22, 1968 Peanuts strip, in which Linus is doing shorthand, and I see people asking just what he’s saying. Luckily, a few years back, I asked someone who did shorthand. The first panel says “Merry Christmas to all and to all a good night.” The last panel …

Questions answered

Joanne Greenberg

I was just looking at “I Never Promised You an Apple Orchard”: The collected Writings of SNOOPY, a 1976 storybook by Schulz (which is largely gags taken from the strip, although the art is all new), and I saw that it was dedicated “For Joanne Greenberg, of course”. Of course. So …

Questions answered

Was Peanuts the MTV of the print generation?

Friend-of-the-AAUGH-blog Jim has this question: I recall once reading an article that suggested that Beethoven’s popularity and place in the classical pantheon was far less prominent, before Schulz introduced Schroeder and his penchant for the composer. Being vastly ignorant of classical music myself, I couldn’t at the time know how …