I just can’t find the right words for this.

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Some among the Peanuts fandom may miss the Snoopy magazine of the 1980s, bring an officially licensed Peanuts item into their mailbox on a regular basis. And the ending of the Peanuts comic book a few years back meant the end of going to the comic shop on a regular basis. Are we to make it through the rest of our lives without a periodic fix of a Peanuts periodical?

AAUGH Blog reader Deb points out to me that, no, we have an option! For this year has brought a new Peanuts magazine into play….¬†Peanuts Word Seeks.

This publication, available at finer newsstands and through subscription, brings you a bimonthly dose of Peanuts clip-art attached to the usual set of word grids that one can see a ducky or a horsie in, if you look closely enough.

This brings two thoughts to mind:

  1. After all these years of word searching puzzles, haven’t all the words been found by now? Isn’t it like bitcoin mining, where finding a new word at this point would require such a vast commitment of computing that it would have severe environmental consequences.
  2. I would not consider it a true Peanuts word seek magazine unless it has something that looks like this:
Die Comics
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Schulz’s Revenge

Charles Schulz gets his revenge on the comics field in the new hardcover Peanuts: DIE COMICS! Well, either that, or this is just the German translation of Peanuts Dell Archive. But do you dare assume that and risk missing out on something great?? (By the way, at the moment I …

Section from a coloring book cover with Peanuts and Snoopy logos
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All the moles in a whack-a-mole game are fake

AAUGH Blog reader Caren noted that the bootleg Peanuts ebooks I linked to the other day had already been deleted, so victory, right? Of course not. Two days after my post, the same fake editions had already been re-uploaded. The timeless work of Dolores J Douglas endures, as does that …

Discounts
The Eternal Questions

Some holidays have questions attached. For example, the seder, the traditional meal ceremony that begins the Jewish holiday of Passover, features a quarter of questions built around the theme of “why is this night different from all other nights?” Valentine’s Day has “Do you love me?” April Fool’s Day has …