Charles Schulz on Peanuts books

Classic finds

Writer Luke Epplin pointed to some material I had not seen before, some of which is right up the alley here at Peanuts book central. It’s correspondence from 1954 between Schulz and the great Walt Kelly. Schulz had this to say about collections of his own work:

My book is filled with so much bad work, that I would consider it presumptuous on my part to send you one. After the first book came out, I wished that they would put out another so that my more recent work would show up. Now that the second book is out, I am just so much ashamed. Where does it all end?

The books in question would be Peanuts (published in 1952) and More Peanuts (published in 1954.) Schulz’s attitude toward his own early work presumably has much to do with why the material in the first book was not moved into the various other book series that came along, until The Complete Peanuts.

If you ever look at your work and feel that it is too crappy to be seen, remember that if Charles Schulz could be wrong about that, you may be as well.

You can read the full correspondence here. (And if you find yourself wondering why Kelly refers to Schulz’s book costing half a buck more than his own dollar book, when the Rinehart paperbacks were just a buck: Rinehart put out a hardcover of More Peanuts, priced at $1.50.)

New releases
Where Eagles Dare To Edit

Eagle-eyed AAUGH Blog reader David noted that for this year’s Peanuts desk calendar, they’re reformatting the 1971 strips into narrower panels… and that’s not the only change. Check the last few words – where the original January 16, 1971 strip had said “just walk around”, in now says “just walkS …

New releases
REVIEW: Peanuts mini comic books

The new series of Peanuts mini comic books issued by The Charles Schulz Museum are some of the more expensive Peanuts books ever issued. After all, for a normal Peanuts book, you just have to walk over to the bookstore and give them money, but for these supposedly “free” mini …

New releases
From the “my views are reality, your views are bias” pile

The new, brief Schulz biography Charles Schulz: an Account for the Young and the Casually Curious, is a self-published, print-on-demand effort with a stated mission. Author Matt Trimble says that other biographies “are often laced with the author’s own interpretations and biases. Therefore, I have attempted to compile a brief, …