When you look at the world through Peanuts-colored lenses

General

Some days, it seems that I cannot get far away from Peanuts, no matter what I’m doing. For example, at the moment I’m working on an article about some mid-1960s cartoon books about Jewish women who run brothels. Really, there’s more than one of these – at least six. It was a thing. And in doing so, I reference the 1964 movie that likely inspired them,¬†A House is Not a Home, starring Shelley Winters in the adaptation of Jewish madam Polly Adler’s 1953 autobiography. And there in the cast list is Kaye Ballard… the comedienne who recorded an album of Peanuts humor in 1962. So then I look a little more into the book the film was based on, and it was originally published in 1953. By Rinehart & Co., the publishing company that at the time was in the midst of publishing the early¬†Peanuts books.

All roads lead to Peanuts.

General
Political footballs

I have long wanted to do a nice long write-up on how well the Lucy-pulls-the-football-away gag has integrated itself into the political discourse; how it is used by legislators and commenters alike. I think there’s a great piece to be done on that, as it is one way that Peanuts …

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Spike was a secret Trekkie because of… MURDER!

Dadgummit, I was so proud of my theory why those two July 1978 strips were originally drawn with Spike watching Hogan’s Heroes, yet were edited and run in newspapers with Spike watching Star Trek instead. The dates! The companies! It all fit together!!! But sometimes Occam whips out his razor …

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Which Peanuts character is a SECRET TREKKIE – and why has it been covered up for decades?

If you’ve read through a lot of Peanuts books reprints strips from the 1970s, you’ve probably come across installments where, in the final panel, Snoopy’s brother Spike is watching Hogan’s Heroes: Yes, these would be comic strips drawn by Sgt. Schulz, the World War II veteran turned cartoonist, depicting dialogue …