Oh, Good Gravy!

How many errors can you find in this first paragraph of a review of Schulz and Peanuts?

Charles M. Schulz’s original syndicated comic strip, called L’il Folks, appeared in just seven newspapers. Shortly afterward, he renamed it Peanuts, and the rest is legend. At the time of Schulz’s death in 2000, the names of Charlie Brown, Linus and Lucy Van Pelt, Schroeder, Peppermint Patty, Snoopy, and the rest of the gang were known to 300 million readers in 75 countries. Royalties from newspaper syndication, toys, games, TV specials, and commercials for Met Life and Ford brought in billions. Schulz’s international celebrity and monetary rewards should have added up to an immense satisfaction. But no, according to David Michaelis’s new biography.

It a surprise when a former editor of Time (one Stefan Kanfer) writes with the accuracy of a third grade book report…

General
Can an oblivious soul become a blogger?

It’s good to have smart people to catch you when you miss something, and Tim Chow – whom I worked with when we were accumulating rare Schulz material for Complete Peanuts 26 – just caught me on something. You may remember a recent post where I was confused my an …

General
When you think you understand a strip…

There’s a strip from the 1950s where Charlie Brown is examining the books on Lucy’s shelf and finds such titles as Can a Fuss-Budget Find Love and Happiness?, The Decline and Fall of the Fuss-Budget, and, as a punchline, Can a Fuss-Budget Become President? And I thought I got the joke, I really …

General
Pawlowski retires

Stan Pawlowski, the long time sculptor of Peanuts items who I interviewed on the AAUGH Blog Podcast, has announced his retirement as of today, for safety reasons. (His aging hands and health are not compatible with “working with torches and harsh chemicals”, he notes.) He has done a lot of …